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Handboek zakelijk Engels

Cover of Handboek zakelijk EngelsIn de moderne, internationaal georiënteerde organisatie is het Handboek zakelijk Engels, geschreven door Andy en Astrid Baxter, een onmisbaar naslagwerk voor dagelijks gebruik. Voor iedereen die werkzaam is in communicatie, marketing, PR of HR, maar ook voor studenten in het hoger en wetenschappelijk onderwijs, biedt het handboek hulp bij het schrijven van allerhande documenten.Dit helder geschreven boek is uitermate praktisch en handig in gebruik en geeft veel bruikbare voorbeelden – ideaal als je regelmatig in het Engels communiceert. Alle media komen aan bod: van e-mails, brieven en cv’s tot rapporten, presentaties en vergaderingen. Ook de sociale media, zoals LinkedIn, Facebook en Twitter, ontbreken niet in deze nieuwe, herziene versie. Het handboek staat vol handige weetjes en feitjes, behoedt je voor beruchte valkuilen en maakt je bewust van de verschillen tussen stijlen en verschillende varianten van het Engels, zoals het Brits en het Amerikaans.

Klik op de advertentie rechts om uw exemplaar van Handboek zakelijk Engels te bestellen.

 

 

 

Abbreviating number and numbers

telephone_numbersThe English abbreviation of number is no., and the plural is nos. Do not use nr. – this is the English abbreviation of near.

Tel. no.
Report No. 235097
Symphonies Nos. 5 and 7

©2015 Baxter Publishing, Hilversum, The Netherlands

Price or prize?

trophies

What’s the difference between a price and a prize? A price is the money you pay for something when you buy it. A prize is an award that you win in a competition if you perform better than everyone else.

Many languages (e.g., Dutch, German and French) have only one word for both concepts.

Be careful to pronounce the two words differently. Price is pronounced short and sharp with a ‘hard’ s. Prize is longer and more relaxed, with a ‘soft’ z.

Click here to hear the difference.

©2015 Baxter Publishing, Hilversum, The Netherlands

Silent b after m

letter-bIn almost all words in English whose spelling ends in -mb, the b is not actually pronounced. So all these words are pronounced without the b: bomb (rhymes with from), lamb (rhymes with ham), thumb and dumb (rhyme with gum), climb (rhymes with time), womb and tomb (rhyme with room), and limb (rhymes with Jim).

And how do you pronounce -mb- in the middle of a word? That depends on whether the word is related to one whose spelling ends in -mb. If it is, then the b is not pronounced: so you won’t hear it in bomber, lambing, climbing, dumbest, etc. If there is no such related word, then the b is pronounced, so timber, lumber, clamber, amber, etc., are pronounced the way they look!

©2015 Baxter Publishing, Hilversum, The Netherlands

Do you really mean perspectives – or prospects?

perspective1Perspectives are not ‘future opportunities’, but ‘ways of looking at things’:

The report offers some good perspectives on what is going on.
The leaflet offers some very good perspectives to help you figure out your feelings.

For ‘future opportunities’, the word you need is prospects:

Prospects for the manufacturing sector are good.
What are the prospects for peace?
What are your career prospects?

©2015 Baxter Publishing, Hilversum, The Netherlands

Beside or besides?

Two British phoneboxesHer office is beside (= next to) mine.

Besides (= in addition to) products, the company also provides many services.

Besides (= moreover), the company provides many services.

© 2015 Baxter Publishing, Hilversum, The Netherlands

Don’t confuse ‘exciting’ and ‘exiting’

exit-signDon’t make the common spelling mistake of writing exciting without its -c-. If you do, you’ll end up with the totally different word exiting (pronounced EGG-zitting). This is a form of the verb to exit ‘to leave’.

©2015 Baxter Publishing, Hilversum, The Netherlands

False friends: ‘good’ and ‘goed’

GoodBe careful not to give something your approval when you don’t mean to. In English, good always expresses a favourable or positive judgement.

Although, like English good, Dutch goed can also express such approval, it more often only expresses agreement or acceptance – cases where English would use OK, all right, right or correct:

A: Ik bel je straks. B: Goed.
A: I’ll call you later. B: OK.

A: Mag hij ook mee? B: Ja, goed, maar alleen als er ruimte is.
A: Can he come too? B: All right, but only if there’s room.

A: Ik zie je om 10 uur. B: Goed. Tot dan.
A: I’ll see you at 10. B: Right, see you then.

Dat is niet het goede antwoord.
That’s not the correct answer.

© 2015 Baxter Publishing, Hilversum, The Netherlands

Lastly or at last?

DruckThese two expressions look very similar, but it’s important not to confuse them, because their meanings are quite different.

Lastly,… (Dutch ten slotte).

For example:
Lastly, I would just like to say…

At last/At long last (Dutch eindelijk).

For example:
At last! Where have you been?!

© 2015 Baxter Publishing, Hilversum, The Netherlands

Christmas carols and songs – a quiz

King Wenceslas and his page doing good in Bohemia

King Wenceslas and his page doing good in Bohemia

Clued-up about Christmas Songs and Carols? Try this quiz and complete the missing words!

  1. _____ King Wenceslas looked out / On the Feast of Stephen
  2. O _____ town of Bethlehem / How still we see thee lie
  3. O come, all ye _____ / Joyful and triumphant
  4. Hark, the herald angels _____ / ‘Glory to the newborn King’
  5. Once in royal David’s _____ / Stood a lowly cattle-shed
  6. Rudolf the red-nosed _____ / Had a very shiny nose
  7. Jingle bells, jingle bells, jingle all the way / Oh what fun it is to ride in a one-horse _____ sleigh
  8. _____ the halls with boughs of Holly / Fala-la-la-la la-la-la-la!
  9. God rest you merry _____ / Let nothing you dismay
  10. Ding dong! merrily on _____ / In heaven the bells are ringing

Didn’t get them all? Scroll down for the answers!

  1.  Good King Wenceslas looked out / On the Feast of Stephen
  2. O little town of Bethlehem / How still we see thee lie
  3. O come, all ye faithful / Joyful and triumphant
  4. Hark, the herald angels sing / ‘Glory to the newborn King’
  5. Once in royal David’s city / Stood a lowly cattle-shed
  6. Rudolf the red-nosed reindeer / Had a very shiny nose
  7. Jingle bells, jingle bells, jingle all the way / Oh what fun it is to ride in a one-horse open sleigh
  8. Deck the halls with boughs of Holly / Fala-la-la-la la-la-la-la!
  9. God rest you merry gentlemen / Let nothing you dismay
  10. Ding dong! merrily on high / In heaven the bells are ringing
© 2013 - Baxter Communications | Hilversum - NL

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